This year’s plant decoration 2018

This year’s plant decoration 2018

Then it’s time to resubmit your company’s contribution to the competition’s plant interior of the year.

At the annual meeting in 2017, Wendels Blomsterservice was awarded the winner of the competition, now your company has the chance to win the competition. The responsible organizer is the industry association Nordic Green.

The competition is for member companies in Nordic Green.

Each member company can participate with a project each.

The projects must be with live plants. Not artificial plants.

Send a short text describing your project.

Submit 3 high quality images to:

norway@nordic-green.info

Winner plant decoration of the year 2017

WINNER PLANT DECORATION OF THE YEAR 2017

Wendels Blomsterservice AB

We congratulate Wendels Blomsterservice AB as the winner of this year’s plant decoration! (From left to right: Magnus, Stefan and
Mikael Wendel)

«… The customer wanted to do something extra for his new fixture. Something that could get a space that is in the middle of the warehouse to get the employees to sit down and take it easy for a while, talk and relax. Our proposal was to mount a 475cm wide and 230cm tall plant wall to soften the environment and attract relaxation. Lighting, plant wall, furniture and carpet work together to attract a moment of relaxation. Both Wendels and the customer are very pleased with the result. ”

Autumn meeting 2017

Annual meeting 2017 in Umeaa

Årets Växtinredning 2016

PANTONE brings life to colour in London

Big projects carried out in Sweden!

EILO went Scandinavia

From Thursday September 29 until Saturday Oktober 1, EILO organised an inspiring exursion across two Scandinavian cities, namely Malmö and Copenhagen. The excursion was chock full of visits to some very inspiring projects. Think about the indoor garden at DONG energy, or the Emporia shopping mall or the impressive Interior Garden at Copenhagen Towers.

 

Why plants in the office makes us more productive

Summary:

‘Green’ offices with plants make staff happier and more productive than ‘lean’ designs stripped of greenery, new research shows. The team examined the impact of ‘lean’ and ‘green’ offices on staff’s perceptions of air quality, concentration, and workplace satisfaction, and monitored productivity levels over subsequent months in two large commercial offices in the UK and The Netherlands.

‘Green’ offices with plants make staff happier and more productive than ‘lean’ designs stripped of greenery, new research shows.

In the first field study of its kind, researchers found enriching a ‘lean’ office with plants could increase productivity by 15%.

The team examined the impact of ‘lean’ and ‘green’ offices on staff’s perceptions of air quality, concentration, and workplace satisfaction, and monitored productivity levels over subsequent months in two large commercial offices in the UK and The Netherlands.

Lead researcher Marlon Nieuwenhuis, from Cardiff University’s School of Psychology, said: «Our research suggests that investing in landscaping the office with plants will pay off through an prestigesquare7increase in office workers’ quality of life and productivity.

«Although previous laboratory research pointed in this direction, our research is, to our knowledge, the first to examine this in real offices, showing benefits over the long term. It directly challenges the widely accepted business philosophy that a lean office with clean desks is more productive.»

The research showed plants in the office significantly increased workplace satisfaction, self-reported levels of concentration, and perceived air quality.

Analyses into the reasons why plants are beneficial suggests that a green office increases employees’ work engagement by making them more physically, cognitively, and emotionally involved in their work.

topstandardincl-castors2Co-author Dr Craig Knight, from the University of Exeter, said: «Psychologically manipulating real workplaces and real jobs adds new depth to our understanding of what is right and what is wrong with existing workspace design and management. We are now developing a template for a genuinely smart office.»

Professor Alex Haslam, from The University of Queensland’s School of Psychology, who also co-authored the study added: «The ‘lean’ philosophy has been influential across a wide range of organizational domains. Our research questions this widespread conviction that less is more. Sometimes less is just less.»

Marlon Nieuwenhuis added: «Simply enriching a previously Spartan space with plants served to increase productivity by 15% — a figure that aligns closely with findings in previously conducted laboratory studies. This conclusion is at odds with the present economic and political zeitgeist as well as with modern ‘lean’ management techniques, yet it nevertheless identifies a pathway to a more enjoyable, more comfortable and a more profitable form of office-based working.»

Kenneth Freeman, Head of Innovation at interior landscaping company Ambius, who were involved in the study, said: «We know from previous studies that plants can lower physiological stress, increase attention span and improve well-being. But this is the first long term experiment carried out in a real-life situation which shows that bringing plants into offices can improve well-being and make people feel happier at work. Businesses should rethink their lean processes, not only for the health of the employees, but for the financial health of the organization.»

Source: Science Daily